18 Rarest Gemstones in the World

Gemstones comprise many elements, including minerals, rocks, and even biological matter. Given that there are over 300 gemstones known to exist, it is pretty likely that there are those that are substantially rarer and hence more expensive than the well-known diamond.

Certain crystals contain some of the most costly jewels in the world, yet we are unlikely ever to see these crystals in person. These stones are in extremely high demand among museums and private collectors. It is possible to get other precious gemstones if sufficient funds are available. The following list consists of 18 rare and costly gems.

Top 18 Rarest Gemstones:

Check out these 18 magnificent gemstones that you wouldn’t have thought are rarer than diamonds if you were searching for something unusual to buy for your next piece of jewelry. Diamonds are the most sought-after gem in the world.

1. Royal Demantoid:

Royal Demantoid
Royal Demantoid

Royal dementiods are members of the garnet family, despite their resemblance to emeralds. They may be a dark green hue up to yellow, and the yellow color is due to the presence of ferric iron in the stones. In the middle of the nineteenth century, dementoids were discovered in the mountains of west-central Russia. 

Since its discovery, dementoids have been highly sought after by royal people and families. Royal dementoids are presently worth around $2,000 per carat in the marketplace.

2. Tanzanite:

Tanzanite
Tanzanite

Tanzanite is a deep blue gemstone initially discovered in Tanzania in 1967. It is said to be around 1,000 times rarer than diamonds. Its name comes from the country in which it was found. It is interesting to note that tanzanite can only be discovered in the foothills of Mount Kilimanjaro, and its present worth is around $1,500 per carat.

3. Blue Garnet:

Blue Garnet
Blue Garnet

The blue garnet always makes me think of sapphires, yet it has a tiny emerald hue when viewed in direct sunshine. Although I’ve heard rumors that blue garnet may get as much as $1.5 million, I haven’t been able to verify this information independently. The blue garnet that is most commonly found is found in Madagascar, and its price per carat is between $1,500 and $2,000.

4. Taafeite:

Taafeite
Taafeite

Richard Taaffe, who spotted the stone in a Dublin jewelry shop in 1945, is credited with giving taffeite its name. This stone is almost a million times rarer than a diamond. The mineral known as taffeite may range in color from violet to red and can be found in Tanzania, China, and Sri Lanka. At this time, one carat will set you back $2,000.

5. Jeremejevite:

Jeremejevite
Jeremejevite

There is no set color for jeremejevite; it might seem either sky blue or pastel yellow. This precious stone was found for the first time in Siberia, but Namibia is where some of the finest examples may be found. The price of jeremejevite per carat is around $2,000 at the moment.

6. Opal in Black:

Opal in Black
Opal in Black

The most sought-after and expensive variety of opal is the black opal. It costs around 2,350 dollars per carat, making it far more costly than other opals, even though it contains just about every hue in the rainbow. The continent of Australia is home to an overwhelming majority of the world’s black opal deposits.

In addition, there is a kind of black opal known as fire opal that is far more valuable. The fire opal has three possible colors: dark red, orange, and yellow. The majority of them are extracted from the ground in the states of San Luis Potosi, Chihuahua, Queretaro, Michoacan, and Hidalgo in Mexico.

7. Benitoite:

Benitoite
Benitoite

The majority of people who enjoy jewelry on a day-to-day basis will never be able to appreciate the full beauty of benitoite. Only in San Benito County, California, has discovered this silver gemstone with a sapphire blue color. 

It was George D. Louderback who made the initial discovery of it in the early 1900s. In 1985, it was selected to represent the state of California as its official gemstone. In the past, the stone was given the incorrect classification of spinel; however, because of the rock’s very high degree of brightness, it was finally reexamined and renamed.

You will need to conduct some research to locate a benitoite supplier that can be relied upon and is legitimately selling the mineral. When you do, you should be ready to spend money. 

It will help if you are looking for a stone with a medium body tone and a cut that brings out the stone’s fire to its fullest potential. Stones with a coloration that is too deep will not reflect light very effectively. Stones that are too pale will have a washed-out appearance. 

Do not anticipate discovering stones weighing more than three carats. Stones with medium blue tones fetch an average price of $3,800 per carat as a purchase price. A significant reduction in cost per carat may be achieved by purchasing stones with a total weight of less than one carat.

8. Poudretteite:

Poudretteite
Poudretteite

The powderetteite is a light pink stone initially discovered in Quebec, Canada. The poudretteite cannot be set in rings due to the delicate nature of its composition; nevertheless, it can be placed in pierced ears or brooches so long as the wearers are careful. The going rate for a carat of poudretteite is usually around $3,000.

9. Sapphire of the Padparadscha:

Sapphire of the Padparadscha
Sapphire of the Padparadscha

The Padparadscaha sapphire is an exceptionally uncommon variety of sapphire that can only be discovered in specific locations of Sri Lanka, Madagascar, and Tanzania. 

Due to its one-of-a-kind mixture of pink and orange tones, collectors consider this stone among the most desirable. The precious stone is available in many colors, but experts agree that stones with medium tones are the most popular and hot.

Because Padparadscha sapphires are so hard to come by, purchasers can discover that they must make concessions to complete their purchase. This may require settling for a stone that has a lower degree of clarity and color that is not as vibrant as you’d want or selecting a stone that is of more diminutive size. 

Because gem cutters strive to produce stones with the most significant possible carat weight, the shapes they create can sometimes be bizarre and diverse. This is mainly attributable to the stone’s limited availability and high demand. 

Do not expect to find these sapphires weighing more than two carats without having to pay a premium. Regarding high-quality diamonds, the going rate per carat is around $8,000.

10. Emeralds:

Emeralds
Emeralds

Most of us are familiar with the name emerald. Although most of these beautiful green stones come from South America, emeralds may be found worldwide. The cost of emeralds can range widely depending on the grade of the stone. 

Emeralds of the most excellent grade have a price tag of around $8,000 per carat. Emeralds must be perfect to the naked eye and have high transparency to earn this price.

11. Beryl in Red Color:

Beryl in Red Color
Beryl in Red Color

Beryl comes in many colors, but the red type is one of the rarest. It has only been discovered in Utah and New Mexico. Maynard Bixby made the initial discovery of it in the year 1904. Beryl of gem-quality red has only been mined in Utah, even though it has been discovered in two different locations. 

This one-of-a-kind diamond, which some call the “red emerald,” is tough to locate since the conditions under which it must form are particular. There is no such thing as a red beryl variant of emerald; instead, red beryl is an altogether new gemstone with its categories.

Inclusions are standard in red beryl, just like emeralds, although their presence does not necessarily affect the total value of the gemstone. Caution is advised due to the production of artificial red beryl. 

You are likely dealing with a synthetic material if the red beryl stone you find is of good grade, has outstanding clarity, and has a significant amount of carat weight. Because large red beryl stones are so challenging to come by, they are frequently sold as specimens to collectors rather than being cut. 

The vast majority of beryl stones weigh less than one carat. High-quality material fetches an average price of Ten thousand dollars per carat, making it the most expensive option.

12. Alexandrite:

Alexandrite
Alexandrite

Alexandrite, a member of the emerald family, was given its name in honor of Alexander II, Tsar of Russia. These unusual stones can have a bluish-green or reddish-purple color, and their price per carat is $10,000, making them highly precious. 

It was not until 1830 that the mineral known as alexandrite was uncovered; it was located in the Ural Mountains in Russia. In today’s market, one carat of alexandrite will run customers around $10,000.

13. Ruby from Burma:

Ruby from Burma
Ruby from Burma

Ruby is a precious gem, but those from Myanmar (also known as Burma) are considered to be of the highest quality and color. They are also tough to come by. 

In contrast to the geological circumstances in Myanmar, which typically result in rubies with very little trace iron content, the rubies mined in Thailand have a very high iron concentration, which can cause them to have an excessively dark red color with brownish or purple overtones. 

Because of this, the reds in these gems are typically considerably more vibrant, and their fluorescence is much brighter than the reds in their Thai counterparts. 

However, a ruby of exceptional grades from Thailand may compete with the best from Myanmar. These crimson gems are constantly in demand because of their beautiful hue, which has earned them the moniker “pigeon blood.”

14. Musgravite:

Musgravite
Musgravite

Musgravite is another extremely uncommon precious stone. It is closely similar to Taaffeite, with the primary distinction between the two being the amount of magnesium each mineral contains

The Musgrave Ranges in southern Australia, which were the location of the stone’s initial discovery, inspired the gemstone’s name. The color range of musgravite is quite pleasing, ranging from light olive to deep violet.

15. Paraiba Tourmaline:

Paraiba Tourmaline
Paraiba Tourmaline

This exquisite stone is light blue and costs $12,000 per carat. It was mined in the Brazilian state of Paraiba, located in the northeastern part of the country. 

Because it is not an extraordinarily hard stone, the Paraiba tourmaline cannot withstand much abuse; thus, those who wear it must be especially careful with it. It was not even known as a precious stone until Heitor Dimas Barbosa uncovered it in the 1980s, making it a relatively new addition to the gem world.

16. Jadeite:

Jadeite
Jadeite

On a list of the most precious gemstones in the world, jadeite is consistently positioned relatively close to the top. This precious stone is the jade kind that is both the most costly and the most attractive. The value of this transparent deep green gem is substantially higher than that of other forms of jade because it is significantly rarer.

Suppose you are interested in the appearance of jadeite but do not have the financial means to purchase it. In that case, you might want to explore purchasing nephrite, a less expensive alternative to jade, or aventurine, an imitation of jade. The value of jadeite is determined by the degree to which it is transparent and the amount of color it contains. 

Some gorgeous gems have even sold for over $1 million per carat. Many jadeites on the market will sell at substantially lower prices. When dealing with material of good quality, the going rate per carat is around $20,000 per carat.

17. Pezzottaite:

Pezzottaite
Pezzottaite

Pezzottaite can be in various colors, including raspberry, orangish-red, and even pink. This precious stone, which was first found in Madagascar in 2002 and was subsequently acknowledged by the (IMA) the following year, is also known as the raspberry beryl or raspberry. The price of a carat of pezzottaite averages over $13,000.

18. Painite:

Painite
Painite

From dark brown to red, Painite is a scarce mineral that is hard to come by. Before 2001, just three crystals of painite were known to exist. Painite is a mineral that can only be found in Myanmar, which is located in Asia. It may fetch upwards of sixty thousand dollars per carat when put up for sale.

Frequently Asked Questions:

Which hue of a diamond is the most difficult to find?

Red Gems. In gems, red is one of the rarest hues, and a pure red, such as the well-known pigeon’s blood ruby, is even more uncommon.

Is obsidian a scarce resource?

From a geological point of view, obsidian is considered to be relatively unstable. Obsidian is quite young about most of the continental rocks that make up the crust of the Earth. It is exceedingly uncommon to discover obsidian older than roughly 20 million years.

Bottom Line:

Even though these diamonds are among the rarest in the world, it is still possible to locate them if you know the right places to seek them. Think about investing in one of these stunning and unusual jewels if you’re searching for a way to make your life seem a little more luxurious.

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